Who Is Mary Baker Eddy?

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"Home is the dearest spot on earth, and it should be the centre, though not the boundary, of the affections." Mary Baker Eddy

"As Mary Baker Eddy, I am the weakest of mortals. As the Discoverer and Founder of Christian Science I am the bone and sinew of the world" Mary Baker Eddy

"One could not be long in the presence of that great woman without realizing the remarkable efficiency with which she managed her affairs. Her daily program, three hundred and sixty-five days in the year, with which nothing was permitted to interfere, I well remember. Because of the regularity of her life and the orderly manner in which she...
I can assert with conviction that Mrs. Eddy's home was the only place where I ever saw perfectly consistent application of Scientific Demonstration in all matters. She made it a requirement that we must demonstrate all the material experiences of ordinary daily life and strive to see God back of everything, no matter how insignificant an incident...

During the summer of 1893, James Gilman visited Pleasant View often to work with Mrs. Eddy on her illustrated poem, Christ and Christmas. In Gilman's diary entry of Tuesday, August 8th he recounts "While she was sitting just at my right and a little behind, watching and suggesting as the changes were made in the picture, she said, after...

"Good healers are the only good teachers. A musician must sing or play well and is judged by his performance, not by his blab. Science is practice, proof, not a profession, neither high toned wit or philosophy; these are but apologies for its absence if they possess not the spirit that heals both sickness and sin" Mary Baker Eddy

Mrs. Eddy's demonstration of this book included finding an artist whose thought was not only developed according to artistic standards, but who also possessed a spiritual tendency of thought through which she could work. He must be able to catch her inspiration in his brushmarks. Gilbert Carpenter, Introductory Critique, Recollections of Mary Baker...